| ]


It was 50 years ago in March 1965 that the film version of the hugely popular stage musical The Sound of Music was first released in cinemas to huge critical acclaim - winning 5 Oscars and displacing Gone with the Wind as the highest-grossing film of all-time.
Based on the book 'The Story of the Trapp Family Singers' by Maria von Trapp - played by Julie Andrews in the film - the tale of a family of singers escaping Nazi era Austria captured the imaginations of millions around the world.
The key to the film's popularity was the Grammy Award nominated soundtrack, which made classics of the original Rogers and Hammerstein production songs including 'Edelweiss', 'My Favorite Things', 'Climb Ev'ry Mountain', 'Do-Re-Mi', 'Sixteen Going on Seventeen', 'The Lonely Goatherd' and the title song 'The Sound of Music'.
We are showcasing a fantastic selection of images depicting the film, the various stage versions - including Mary Martin in the 1961 Broadway premiere - as well as portraits and posters of the Von Trapp family themselves!
please contact enquiries@arenapal.com for editorial image usage information


blogger email facebook feed linkedin twitter

| ]

Leonide Massine rehearsing Parade
Photo by Neil Libbert
Nice feedback on last week’s Picasso themed post from photographer Neil Libbert who shared with us some great pictures of choreographer Leonide Massine rehearsing The London Festival Ballets’s 1974 production of Parade.
Costumes and set were designed by Picasso, and the music written by Erik Satie.
MORE IMAGES AVAILABLE - please contact enquiries@arenapal.com for editorial image usage information for this production or email us at enquiries@arenapal.com


blogger email facebook feed linkedin twitter

| ]

Pablo Picasso’s lesser known works are his stage and costume designs - and virtually unknown are his two plays which are as avant-garde as any piece he created on canvas. We have collected together a selection of images which give a sense of his little recognised contribution to the performing arts during his career.
Picasso collaborated with Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes on the Erik Satie and Jean Cocteau ballet Parade in 1917.
Picasso the Designer
Beginning his theatrical work with set and costume design, Picasso collaborated with Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes on the Erik Satie and Jean Cocteau ballet Parade in 1917. The artist’s signature Cubist elements are evident across the design, with several of the costumes being made out of boxy cardboard. His later work on the production of The Three-Cornered Hat in 1919 helped to revitalise Ballet Russes’ profile.
Rita Renoir in Le Desir attrape par la queue by Pablo Picasso at the Festival Pas Libre in July 1967
Photo by Mark Ellidge / ArenaPAL
Picasso the Playwright
In 1941 in occupied Paris, Picasso wrote his first play Desire Caught by the Tail– a surreal and often nonsensical piece containing characters such as The Onion, Big Foot ,Fat Anxiety and Thin Anxiety. The first performance, a reading directed by Albert Camus, took place in March 1944 and featured Simone de Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre and Valentine Hugo, as well as Picasso himself. His second and only other play was The Four Little Girls in 1949.
We have recently scanned a batch of images by Mark Ellidge depicting a performance of the play at the 1960s hippy festival The Freedom of Free Expression [contains nudity].
MORE IMAGES AVAILABLE - please contact enquiries@arenapal.com for editorial image usage information for this production or email us at enquiries@arenapal.com


blogger email facebook feed linkedin twitter

| ]

snapshot Backstory layers copy
When a photographer scans their archive a cornucopia of performing arts history is unlocked. This is the first in a series of images where one of our photographers will share a background story to a favourite shot. First see if you can work out who it is and then scroll down for the answer and the story!

Jim Carter, 1984
Answer: Jim Carter by Photographer Sheila Burnett – whom today’s audiences are more used to seeing in a butler’s uniform serving the residents of Downton Abbey!
But why is he clowning around?
Sheila explains: “Probably because he loved it, I don't think he ever had any intention of being a 'straight' actor at this stage, but he was big and brave with this booming stunning voice. He joined Brighton Combination 1971 for a fiver a week along with other like-minded 'performers'. He always had this magic thing, he loved it and once when about 6 of us went on hols together, he packed all these clown outfits so we could busk in South of France. We spent a lot of time making human pyramids in village squares…I’ve got those piccies somewhere too!”
View more images from this shoot here

blogger email facebook feed linkedin twitter

| ]


Friday 12th December is the UK's official Panto Day and to celebrate this auspicious date we have gathered together a host of our most weird and wonderful images of pantomime animals!
From the traditional pantomime horse, cow and goose, to the more bizarre versions of monkeys and lions - one or more actors dressed up in animal costume has been a staple of the British panto since the modern form rose to popularity in the Victorian era.
And if these images have you yearning to try out a costume for yourself, there is always the annual London Pantomime Horse Race in Greenwich on Sunday 14th December!
We look forward to seeing you there!
pantodaylogo

blogger email facebook feed linkedin twitter

| ]


'If you love art, folly or the bright eyes of children, speed to Pollock's'
...wrote Robert Louis Stevenson in an essay which immortalised Pollock’s Toy Shop - a business that was started in 1856 and still runs today from Covent Garden in London.
A search through the extensive University of Bristol Theatre Collection has recently uncovered a magnificent photo-documentary by renowned theatre photographer John Vickers (1916-1976) of a visit he made to the Benjamin Pollock Ltd workshops in the late 1940s. The company, at the time, was under new management and enjoying a revival of interest due to the demand for newly manufactured Bakelite and wood kits.

Pollock’s speciality was in fact the sale and manufacture of Toy Theatres - otherwise known as Juvenile Drama. Traditionally the kits comprised a paperboard stage and accompanying set design with cut out characters according to the play being sold - and sometimes the likeness of popular actors of the time. The miniature production would be performed to family and friends using an abridged script and, until the introduction of the television, was one of the most popular forms of home entertainment in Europe. Toy theatre has seen a resurgence in recent years and there are numerous international toy theatre festivals throughout the Americas and Europe.

| ]

As Helen Mirren takes her award winning role in Peter Morgan's hit play The Audience to Broadway and Kristin Scott Thomas is confirmed as the Queen in London’s forthcoming revival we take a look at other icons of our time who have been represented on stage.
View all Icons of Our Time images here
Most recent Royal incarnations include Mike Bartlett’s Charles III imagining the future lives of Prince Charles and Prince Harry and Moira Buffini’s Handbagged which eavesdrops on the weekly meetings between the Queen and Margaret Thatcher.
But it's not just the Royal family that playwrights have depicted on the stage - take a look through our selection of images below to find Albert Einstein, Anna Nicole Smith, Eva PerĂ³n, Che Guevara, Muammar Gaddafi, Joseph Stalin, John Gielgud, John Barrymore, Maria Callas, W. H. Auden and Benjamin Britten plus musicians Ray Davies, Kurt Cobain, Sid Vicious, The Beatles, Buddy Holly and more.
blogger email facebook feed linkedin twitter

 
Photo Blog Blogs